Latest News: The Great Trubulation


Pages (7): « First < Previous 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 Next > Last »
Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?
Author Message
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #16
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Quote:
A hierarchy has told and thus we believe.


Ah, SW, bro! And here we are supposedly learning to do our own homework and to think for ourselves, are we not!

Sis :siskiss:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-08-2008 03:10 PM
Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #17
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Quote:
This is not necessarily the case. Medical marijuana, a.k.a. Cannabinol, is in pill form. At least in my area. And it is in controlled doses, so the patient isn't necessarily getting "high" either.


Tami, thank you for bringing up the subject of the pill form of cannabis. In discussing it with my doctor I learned that, like most products of the pharma-industry, the pill form of cannabis has been fractionated and is dreadfully expensive....at least here. As well, it has not been found to be as effective as the whole plant.

The use of cannabis is difficult to relegate to pill form for several reasons. For one, a person may develop a tolerance and thus need to regulate the dosage for themselves or change the strain that they are using to avoid that outcome.

Another reason is the synergistic effect of the various cannabinoids in the plant. It can be compared somewhat to Vitamin C and its related components in, say, fruit -- bioflavinoids and rutin, etc. If you use purified Vitamin C (ascorbic acid) to strengthen your gums but don't ingest the related components it will do little to accomplish the purpose. That is one reason that some people are disappointed with the results they receive from the pills.

:happyheart:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-08-2008 03:35 PM
Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #18
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Derek....WOW! Thanks for that report. I'll be copying it to my research files.:thumbsup:

Quote:
"I want the judge to send a letter to all those people saying why they will no longer receive our medication," says Lezley. "I can't do that"


Here in Canada the courts have been pressing Health Canada to make decent medical cannabis available to those needing it. Health Canada has been dragging its feet on the matter and one wonders what is behind such reluctance. My own feelings about it are that there are powerful interests from the US who are influencing the legal climate in Canada.

The happy part about this sad state of affairs is that, in spite of harassment and intimidation there are still those who are willing to engage in civil disobedience to keep up the supply of medicine for those persons who cannot, for one reason or another, take either over-the-counter or prescription drugs for their symptoms. (Shades of Gandhi and the salt issue in India)

Here's a question...."Would it be against Christian principles to engage in civil disobedience for any reason?"

Love, Rez:giverose:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-08-2008 03:48 PM
Find all posts by this user
brendan
Member


Posts: 691
Group: Registered
Joined: Dec 2007
Status: Offline
Post: #19
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Oh, you independent thinkers! ‘There exists a way that seems right to a man’ etc. Seriously, though, this issue must be about two things, not just one.

First, is it a conscience issue for us? Then, is it a conscience issue for others, and how do we deal with that?

Where only our own conscience is concerned, I think the issue breaks into two smaller things:

Is it good for you?
Is it legal?
Is it scripturally approved, disapproved, or not mentioned?

Where other people’s consciences are concerned, if we have the right (in other words, our own consciences are fine with it), what about the effect on the consciences of other Christians?

This issue reminds me of the matter of Brian’s sexual orientation. Sometimes the less we know about people ensures we can never be stumbled. How that blissful ignorance is harmonised with ‘speak truth with one another’ is open to question. In Brian’s case, he wanted the information out, to create awareness for the plight of so many suffering gay Christians. In this situation here, the information came out in a flow of fellow feeling for another Christian that was not, for the want of a better term, premeditated. But some issues are common to both situations; the conscience issue (personal and other), and the application of scriptural principle according to knowledge of doctrine and how it affects the matter itself.

In the case of the Christian who happily eats meat that was dedicated to idols without a twinge of conscience, he is asked by Paul not to do it in the wrong company. Of course, that is a great principle but life goes way beyond principle. What happens when the weak-conscienced Christian finds out by accident, what does the strong-conscienced Christian do then?

Here are tough questions:

If we are in agony, should we refuse relief because a weak-conscienced brother or sister gets to know about it?

Should we refuse relief that is illegal to remain 'in subjection to the superior authorities?

These are really rhetorical questions, because this cannabis issue is just one case that involves scriptural principles and the complicated questions arising from those principles. We all have our own issues and our own consciences so the conclusions we draw will likely differ greatly.

Regards,
Brendan.

11-08-2008 04:06 PM
Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #20
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Hey-y-y....Brendan, bro! Just the sort of input I'ze lookin' for.:thumbsup:

Quote:
Here are tough questions:

If we are in agony, should we refuse relief because a weak-conscienced brother or sister gets to know about it?

Should we refuse relief that is illegal to remain 'in subjection to the superior authorities?


The scene of this world is changing! Legality or lack of it is an interesting part of this discussion. What are some of the legal issues in our modern world in the area of basic human rights and human suffering?

In a previous post I mentioned Gandhi and the salt tax issue in India for an example. Another one that grabbed my attention some time back was the water war in the South American country of Bolivia. Here's a bit of background:

Quote:
But what's relevant to our discussion of rain barrels is her mention of what happened in Bolivia. They privatized their water resources, with U.S. company Bechtel winning the contract, and subsequently outlawed collection of rainwater because it threatened Bechtel's profits. Here's more on the story. And here's a little video about it (Whoops! We're sorry. This video is no longer available).


Gee....the same thing with Alex Jones' video on the subject of "It is Illegal to Collect Rain Water in the USA".....no more video available. Drat!!!!

So, isn't the issue here not one of stumbling another but rather "What can the government forbid by law?" if it violates a basic human right?

Ahhhhh....thinking man found a good page with a video...not the same one but the theme is the same:

Quote:
Saturday, 6 September 2008
Privatising Water & Illegal Rainwater Harvesting
Today, I've added food for thought to all you water fed poler's out there who are rainwater harvesting or are planning to.

Rain water harvesting in certain states of the US has become illegal. In Colorado, Rain Barrels are illegal. Yup. Please, slowly step away from the rain drops...

Rain drops there, you see, are outlawed. Colorado state law mandates that any water falling from the air is not yours. In fact, according to their site, its already been “legally allocated” — so, you don’t actually have any rights when it comes to using precipitation that falls on your property.

Here’s the exact wording: Colorado Water Law requires that precipitation fall to the ground, run off and into the river of the watershed where it fell. Because rights to water are legally allocated in this state, an individual may not capture and use water to which he/she does not have a right.

Last summer, The Colorado Springs Gazette said the following: “The rain barrel is the bong of the Colorado garden. It’s legal to sell one. It’s legal to own one. It’s just not legal to use it for its intended purpose. Meanwhile, when rain does fall, the torrential flood caused by water running off a few thousand acres of roofs, roads and parking lots erodes downstream ranches, undercuts city sewer pipes and really makes Pueblo mad. It’s gotten so bad that the city is taxing us all, to pay for $295 million in stormwater projects. So wouldn’t it make sense to save a little rain when it falls, keep it from barreling down Fountain Creek, and use it when needed? Of course it would.” And Colorado water law makes it clear, no matter how illogical, that the rain that falls on your roof doesn't belong to you. In fact, you can't even borrow it. It has to go downstream to the person who owns the water rights, who could live in Fountain or as far away as Kansas.


link to "Rainwater harvesting illegal in some US states"

So....you, as a Christian, have a rain barrel and you're collecting rainwater for your garden in Colorado. But, your neighbor, a fellow Christian feels stumbled because you are breaking the law....then what?

:shocked::confused::detective:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-08-2008 05:22 PM
Find all posts by this user
brendan
Member


Posts: 691
Group: Registered
Joined: Dec 2007
Status: Offline
Post: #21
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Hi Rez,

It turned out that in the news clip on that web page, the water law originally came about to protect the person living downstream from the person living upstream who might want to hog the lot. That seems fair enough, and the state seemed to have no interest in pursuing individual cases where the spirit of the law was deemed not to have been broken. The case in South America is much different and very frightening as a possible uniform globalist attitude to the profitability of natural resources, and the insignificance of human needs. If states in a ‘free’ country embrace this scam and government supports them, who knows who will be next? I can remember when privatisation seemed like a great thing, with the hope of competition cutting down costs, and the profit motive encouraging initiative and all that good stuff, but it’s a double-edged sword that will most likely fall on ordinary people in the end.

However, the problem is how to balance our political lives with our Christian lives. You ask:

So....you, as a Christian, have a rain barrel and you're collecting rainwater for your garden in Colorado. But, your neighbor, a fellow Christian feels stumbled because you are breaking the law....then what?

This is where we are on our own! It might encourage us to get to know our brothers and sisters in the locality, to know what information to keep from them. If they find out by accident or some ‘helpful’ Christian tells them…This is where Paul tells weak-conscienced Christians to quit judging, because this is their nature. And he tells the strong-conscienced ones to stop stumbling due to feeling they have the right to do stuff (Romans 14:13).

And we have to reconcile our own consciences to disobeying unfair laws or go dry, at least in this case. Gandhi was a great man but he wasn’t a Christian. Life is weird that a non-Christian can produce more good fruit than most of his Christian fellows, but was he obeying Paul’s word that we should be in subjection. Is there a ‘get out clause’ that ‘we should obey God rather than man’ in these issues? I don’t see one, but I’m not running out of salt, or in agony for the want of a drug that would alleviate the pain. A dose of agony might readjust my thinking!

You say:

So, isn't the issue here not one of stumbling another but rather "What can the government forbid by law?" if it violates a basic human right?

This is a tough one! Can we apply the ‘two wrongs make a right’ thinking? Gandhi could, in passive resistance, if what he did was truly wrong. MLK followed his lead and both of them changed the world. But is our mission in life to change the world or just change ourselves, as in Michael Jackson’s Man In The Mirror? Or should we make a case for our actions being right in essence, although illegal?
The bottom line might be that human rights are God’s command and ‘we should obey God rather than man’. It sounds great but is it valid scriptural-based thinking? It might be significant that Romans 13 advocates obeying the superior authorities because ‘they are God's servants working for your own good’ (verse 4). This is true, generally speaking, but how do we act when they do not act for our good? Paul says in verse 5 that we should obey law not just to avoid punishment but also to keep a clean conscience, so essential to serving God (Hebrews 9:14).

Lots of questions and so few straight answers, and maybe its better that way! We are left to our consciences, (well, God leaves us to them, our fellow Christians often don’t) and nobody understands the factors behind our decisions better than we do.

One last thought comes to mind – how a Christian might interpret Romans 13 when living under a very evil political regime. That could be a topic in itself!

Regards,
Brendan.

11-08-2008 08:55 PM
Find all posts by this user
Beau Wetini
Me and my boy at the beach!


Posts: 2,194
Group: Registered Plus
Joined: Aug 2010
Status: Offline
Post: #22
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Hi mateys! :thumbsup:



Here are two options > :friends:


1. Stop what "we" are doing to cause stumbling...

Or

2. Harden up!!


I like number 2. :friends:


LIVE THE KINGDOM NOW!!


11-08-2008 10:18 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Melancholymuse
Christian


Posts: 1,033
Group: Registered Plus
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #23
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

I think the various governments are totally missing the boat on this whole medical marijuana/cannabis thing.

They could so easily enable patients to access the medical version of the plant by providing some kind of prescription smoking outlet, only for those who are in actual need of it. The patient could get a legal prescription to smoke the cannabis at certain times of the day or week, depending on the patient's condition. Of course, the catch would be that the patient must either go to a government approved place to smoke each dose, or have a government approved health care worker come to the patient's home and administer the dose. It isn't any different than a patient going to a physical therapy program, or having a physical therapist come to one's home.

By having that kind of control, it makes it less easy for the medicine to be abused, and the patient can continue to get the needed relief for his or her problem.

I've seen people helped by cannabis, it is a viable medication when done right. This is something that should be addressed.


Zeal for your house will consume me -- John 2:17 (HCSB)
11-08-2008 11:50 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #24
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Melancholymuse Wrote:
I think the various governments are totally missing the boat on this whole medical marijuana/cannabis thing.

They could so easily enable patients to access the medical version of the plant by providing some kind of prescription smoking outlet, only for those who are in actual need of it. The patient could get a legal prescription to smoke the cannabis at certain times of the day or week, depending on the patient's condition. Of course, the catch would be that the patient must either go to a government approved place to smoke each dose, or have a government approved health care worker come to the patient's home and administer the dose. It isn't any different than a patient going to a physical therapy program, or having a physical therapist come to one's home.

By having that kind of control, it makes it less easy for the medicine to be abused, and the patient can continue to get the needed relief for his or her problem.

I've seen people helped by cannabis, it is a viable medication when done right. This is something that should be addressed.


Tami, I think you're going in the right direction as far as control against abuse goes but here's the snag:

People who generally use cannabis for pain, spasms, nausea or sleep disorders often cannot travel to get each individual dose and having a health care worker come to their home for each dose would be prohibitively expensive....especially in rural areas.

Here's how one of the oldest compassion clubs handles the distribution problem. Firstly, your health care provider (MD, ND, DTCM, or DMD) fills out a form and faxes it to the BCCCS from their office with a diagnosis and their recommendation (or not) for the patient's use of cannabis for their condition.

When the compassion society receives this they conduct a half-hour interview either in person or over the phone, inquiring about such things as the person's health history, the prescription medications they may be taking, their diet and exercise program, their sleep habits, mental health status (because some folks with schizophrenia or psychosis should not take it), their history of cannabis use....etc.

Next, they send out a package of information and forms to sign as well as an identification card to be signed by the patient and carried whenever they have their cannabis on their person. One of the forms is an agreement not to redistribute the cannabis to others. If they break this agreement it may lead to being refused further help from the club.

There is a 15-50 dollar annual membership fee, depending on the person's ability to pay. A 10 dollar shipping and insurance fee for each mail-out is charged if the person is unable to come in person. And the actual cost for the cannabis is very reasonable because most people suffering from HIV, cancer, fibromyalgia, Hep C, MS, etc. are living on a low income or disability pension.

There is a lot more on their website that I'll leave for you and others to read but this club has been operating openly for 11 years and has had no run-ins with the law.

link to BC compassion club society

Love, Rez:giverose:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-09-2008 12:29 PM
Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #25
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Ahhhh....Brendan...you DO love an intellectual challenge don't you!:funnyface:

Quote:
And we have to reconcile our own consciences to disobeying unfair laws or go dry, at least in this case. Gandhi was a great man but he wasn’t a Christian. Life is weird that a non-Christian can produce more good fruit than most of his Christian fellows, but was he obeying Paul’s word that we should be in subjection. Is there a ‘get out clause’ that ‘we should obey God rather than man’ in these issues? I don’t see one, but I’m not running out of salt, or in agony for the want of a drug that would alleviate the pain. A dose of agony might readjust my thinking!


All righty then....applying Paul's words at Acts 13 about being in subjection to the superior authorities really does need to be balanced doesn't it. What might the "get out clause" be? And keep in mind that a Christian's conscience is a very individual thing. While these things can be discussed freely, no one can make a ruling for another. (I know...I'm preaching to the choir here- LOL)

In Jesus' day the Law that was given through Moses was added to greatly by both an oral and a written tradition that came from man's reasoning. Often it made the word of God invalid and was condemned by our Lord. (Matthew 15:3-6) But even without the additions, the Mosaic Law was an impossible burden as Peter observed at Acts 15:10-11:

". . .Now, therefore, why are YOU making a test of God by imposing upon the neck of the disciples a yoke that neither our forefathers nor we were capable of bearing? 11 On the contrary, we trust to get saved through the undeserved kindness of the Lord Jesus in the same way as those people also.”

Even though the Sabbath law was God-given, its interpretation was open to question as far as it was being applied by the Pharisees. Here's an example at Matthew 12:1-14:

"At that season Jesus went through the grainfields on the sabbath. His disciples got hungry and started to pluck heads of grain and to eat. 2 At seeing this the Pharisees said to him: “Look! Your disciples are doing what it is not lawful to do on the sabbath.” 3 He said to them: “Have YOU not read what David did when he and the men with him got hungry? 4 How he entered into the house of God and they ate the loaves of presentation, something that it was not lawful for him to eat, nor for those with him, but for the priests only? 5 Or, have YOU not read in the Law that on the sabbaths the priests in the temple treat the sabbath as not sacred and continue guiltless? 6 But I tell YOU that something greater than the temple is here. 7 However, if YOU had understood what this means, ‘I want mercy, and not sacrifice,’ YOU would not have condemned the guiltless ones. 8 For Lord of the sabbath is what the Son of man is.”

9 After departing from that place he went into their synagogue; 10 and, look! a man with a withered hand! So they asked him, “Is it lawful to cure on the sabbath?” that they might get an accusation against him. 11 He said to them: “Who will be the man among YOU that has one sheep and, if this falls into a pit on the sabbath, will not get hold of it and lift it out? 12 All considered, of how much more worth is a man than a sheep! So it is lawful to do a fine thing on the sabbath.” 13 Then he said to the man: “Stretch out your hand.” And he stretched it out, and it was restored sound like the other hand. 14 But the Pharisees went out and took counsel against him that they might destroy him."


I guess all I want to say here is that a good part of Jesus' ministry was about compassion and not the letter of the law. I think I'd rather err on the side of mercy on this or any issue. Having said that, I should be willing to take possible repercussions for civil disobedience, shouldn't I. Jesus did!

Quote:
One last thought comes to mind – how a Christian might interpret Romans 13 when living under a very evil political regime. That could be a topic in itself!


That might be a good topic for the thinktank, Brendan because that time might soon be upon us. I would think that now is the time to practice utilizing that wonderful gift: Our conscience! BTW...would you like to start such a thread here?

Thanks so much for your well-thought-out post, bro!

And to our reign-beau guy, I say.....yeah! I'm with no. 2, too.

Love, Rez:giverose:


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-09-2008 01:24 PM
Find all posts by this user
man hu
Babe and any other piggy names


Posts: 2,498
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #26
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Resolute Wrote:
Even though the Sabbath law was God-given, its interpretation was open to question as far as it was being applied by the Pharisees. Here's an example at Matthew 12:1-14:"At that season Jesus went through the grainfields on the sabbath. His disciples got hungry and started to pluck heads of grain and to eat. 2 At seeing this the Pharisees said to him: “Look! Your disciples are doing what it is not lawful to do on the sabbath.” 3 He said to them: “Have YOU not read what David did when he and the men with him got hungry? 4 How he entered into the house of God and they ate the loaves of presentation, something that it was not lawful for him to eat, nor for those with him, but for the priests only? 5 Or, have YOU not read in the Law that on the sabbaths the priests in the temple treat the sabbath as not sacred and continue guiltless? 6 But I tell YOU that something greater than the temple is here. 7 However, if YOU had understood what this means, ‘I want mercy, and not sacrifice,’ YOU would not have condemned the guiltless ones. 8 For Lord of the sabbath is what the Son of man is.” 9 After departing from that place he went into their synagogue; 10 and, look! a man with a withered hand! So they asked him, “Is it lawful to cure on the sabbath?” that they might get an accusation against him. 11 He said to them: “Who will be the man among YOU that has one sheep and, if this falls into a pit on the sabbath, will not get hold of it and lift it out? 12 All considered, of how much more worth is a man than a sheep! So it is lawful to do a fine thing on the sabbath.” 13 Then he said to the man: “Stretch out your hand.” And he stretched it out, and it was restored sound like the other hand. 14 But the Pharisees went out and took counsel against him that they might destroy him."I guess all I want to say here is that a good part of Jesus' ministry was about compassion and not the letter of the law. I think I'd rather err on the side of mercy on this or any issue. Having said that, I should be willing to take possible repercussions for civil disobedience, shouldn't I. Jesus did!

Quote:
One last thought comes to mind – how a Christian might interpret Romans 13 when living under a very evil political regime. That could be a topic in itself!

That was the scripture that came instantly to mind Rez.

The letter of the law was so ingrained in these people, that they could see a miracle and rather than praise God, they took counsel to kill the miracle worker.

All this hooha about one drug is stupid.
As many of you know when working as a Samaritan I got a phone call from a woman who had been in unbearable pain for more than four months.
She had mountains of pain killers and sleeping tablets; all prescribed to get her through each day. She kept on going, in the knowledge that she had an appointment for a specialist pain clinic.
Unfortunately when the day arrived for her to go to the clinic, the ambulance was late, and the clinic was closed when she arrived. They turned around and brought her home.

Her pain had been unbearable and she preferred to die, than to be in continual pain.

Yes Brendan, perhaps we all need a touch of pain to make us aware of the plight of others.

I know when I broke my leg and they put the cast on wrongly so it was pulling on the break, I was in so much pain I could hardly speak, and would have gladly ended my life if I thought I would wake up each and every day in such pain.

Now I don't know if cannabis would have been any help to this lady, but she had enough 'legal' pharmaceutical medication in her home, to kill off a herd of elephants, or certainly a herd of donkeys; but then we know the law is an ass.

Supposing cannabis could have helped, yet, it was illegal for her to own any?
By law she could have opiate derivitives in her cabinet e.g. Demerol, codeine and morphine.

Until 1916, it was legal to purchase cocaine over the counter in the US.
It was given to the Bavarian army to increase their endurance, and put in all types of toothpaste and tonics.

It was combined with alcohol to make cocaethylene, and these wines were endorsed by royalty and the pope.

Coca-Cola was first sold in 1886, as a temperance drink offering cocaine without the problems of alcohol.
Because it was invigorating, it became popular. It was in the 1900's that the active ingredient was removed, though they still use the flavouring.

Sigmund Freud (the nutter for nutters) not only took loads of cocaine himself, but also sent some to his fiancee, to give her rosy cheeks.
Pharmaceutical companies, Merke and Parke Davies, both paid Freud for his endorsements of their products. Insane, he may have been, but not in money matters!

My take? I try to avoid as much medication as possible. If a doctor says it will help, I will take the prescription, but pour over the internet before I will cash in the prescription or let the drug into my body.

I have done alot of study on biochemistry and know that one of the things drugs do is trick the body into 'thinking' one molecule is another.

Heck we still use phenol, and that is carcinogenic! It is the stuff that gives hospitals 'that smell'.

If you are prescribed a drug, do not assume it is alright because a doctor, a pharmaceutical company and a government have approved it.
Do your own research.

If you find something that helps your ailment, and does not become a menace, use it. Better still patent it! Sorry being silly.

Our God given life is in our hands, so that life is sacred. Research and care for it how you deem best.


vicky


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V1sj2gQJIKI
11-09-2008 04:11 PM
Find all posts by this user
Resolute
politicus incorrectissimus in extremis


Posts: 1,883
Group: Moderator
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #27
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Thanks for your thoughts, Vickers!

That experience of the woman in pain brought to mind a time, not too long ago, when an elder in a neighboring congregation who was in hospital with cancer of the brain, screamed his way to death because it was against medical policy at the time to administer morphine. They didn't want anyone to become an addict! I still get a horrible mental picture from the experience... :cry:

Yes, by all means do your research and be pro-active in your medical treatment.:readthis:

Love, Rez:giverose:

PS...and BTW, cannabis deals with the pain without fouling up your bowels the way that morphine does.


When bad men combine, the good must associate; else they will fall one by one… – Edmund Burke
11-09-2008 04:46 PM
Find all posts by this user
observant
Concerning the Lilies


Posts: 800
Group: Registered Plus
Joined: Dec 2006
Status: Offline
Post: #28
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Quote:
So, isn't the issue here not one of stumbling another but rather "What can the government forbid by law?" if it violates a basic human right?


There are many things around us that are harmful to human life. For example let's look at Abortion. Viewing this from a moral standpoint one could say.. I don't care what the law is, I view this as an affront to God. I am going to go against the law of the land and stop it.

Or pollution. A huge company is dumping waste into the river, the Government allows it, but we as citizens can rise up and stop this tragedy. For I have the right to clean water, and so does my fellow man, the ends justify the means in this case.

Or Animal testing. Doesn't it just break our hearts to see the defilement taking place there. We could make it our personal mission to end the mistreatment of animals.

Could people be helped? Animals? The unborn? Those in Pain?

or with this issue, could a personal pain be releived by us advocating and promoting something that we see as helpful to others and yet the government of the land says otherwise? Believing we have the high moral ground, even in light of Romans 14.

What are follower of Jesus to do? What commision do we have? Is it not to preach the good News?

Rom 10:14 How then shall they call on Him in whom they have not believed? And how shall they believe in Him of whom they have not heard? And how shall they hear without preaching? :15 And how shall they preach unless they are sent? As it is written, "How beautiful are the feet of those who preach the gospel of peace and bring glad tidings of good things!"

Now Is this Good news of the benefits of a plant? Or a different avenue to relieve pain such as Euthanasia, which many view should be lawful, merciful an a basic human right. Or the stopping of killing of unborn children?

No, it isn't. Did Jesus keep us in this world for such a purpose?

Joh 17:14 I have given them Your Word, and the world has hated them because they are not of the world, even as I am not of the world.:15 I do not pray for You to take them out of the world, but for You to keep them from the evil. :16 They are not of the world, even as I am not of the world. Joh 17:17 Sanctify them through Your truth. Your Word is truth. :18 As You have sent Me into the world, even so I have sent them into the world. :19 And I sanctify Myself for their sakes, so that they also might be sanctified in truth.
Joh 17:20 And I do not pray for these alone, but for those also who shall believe on Me through their word,


We have been givin his WORD. So that those hear it may believe. We are not part of this world, it's issues of lawfulness or it's version of righteousness.We have been sent by Jesus to preach his Testimony, and no other.Someone said, our God given life is in our hands? But is it really? We have forsaken all things to follow Jesus, our life is not our own, it belongs to him. For this is what Romans 14 is all about.

Love Lynn


Consider the lilies, how they grow; they do not toil, they do not spin. And yet I say to you that Solomon in all his glory was not arrayed like one of these. Luk 12:27
11-09-2008 07:18 PM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
brendan
Member


Posts: 691
Group: Registered
Joined: Dec 2007
Status: Offline
Post: #29
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

Hi Lynn,

That was a brave post indeed! And there is no difficulty in seeing where you are coming from. I think it would be a grave error to look on our Christian life as having the purpose of social reform, like liberation theology. To me, this is the bottom line of Romans 14:

So then each one of us will give account concerning himself to God. Then let us not judge one another any more, but rather judge this, not to put a stumbling-block or an offense toward his brother. Romans 14:12, 13

In other words, it seems to be a very personal issue. If it developed into a group thing, I think that would be a perversion of the individual Christian conscience. The reason I’m saying that is that I think the Christian conscience deals with moral issues pretty much passively, reacting to their own needs and the law of the land and not in co-operation with other Christians, but individually with the consciences of other Christians in mind. A group reaction to Christian group needs in response to civil laws is more like a reform movement, and would be more active than passive.

I was keen to write a reply to your post because I’ve been asked in the Think Tank to start a thread about civil disobedience and Christianity, especially under an evil regime, and it will, hopefully, give plenty more opportunity to explore this topic.

Regards,
Brendan.

11-09-2008 09:47 PM
Find all posts by this user
Chuck
Sonofcomfort


Posts: 328
Group: Registered Plus
Joined: Jan 2007
Status: Offline
Post: #30
RE: Cannabis - gift from God or weed from hell?

29 And God went on to say: “Here I have given to YOU all vegetation bearing seed which is on the surface of the whole earth and every tree on which there is the fruit of a tree bearing seed. To YOU let it serve as food.

27 So they brought them and stood them in the courts. And the high officials questioned them 28 and said: “We positively ordered YOU to stop using canabis on any basis, and yet, look! YOU have filled the room with pot smoke, and YOU are determined to bring the legalization of this plant to all humanity.” 29 In answer resolute and the [others] said: “We must obey God as ruler rather than men. :funnyface::happyheart:

:smoker::nicethread:


http://watchtowerunitednations.blogspot.com/
Ask and you shall receive!
11-10-2008 01:09 AM
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Pages (7): « First < Previous 1 [2] 3 4 5 6 Next > Last »

View a Printable Version
Send this Thread to a Friend
Subscribe to this Thread | Add Thread to Favorites

Forum Jump: